Sunday, October 10, 2010

Nine Questions for Matilda

It's easy to forget that in every good romance there are two major characters. Often, authors forget that each is as important as the other--cause a romance takes two, this isn't Narcissus, after all. Recently, my interview of Wilhelm Van Lipsig, The Lone Wolf, was posted by Pat Bertram. I decided that his lady, Matilda DuLac, deserves equal time. So, here is a short interview with Matilda.


Dellani: How do you learn best?

Matilda: I learn best by seeing and doing. That's the way my dad taught me to mine and the way I do everything now.

Dellani: How open are you to new ideas and information?

Matilda: Life is about learning. If I don't learn, I stagnate. I'm open to new ideas, but often want proof that they're valid before I adopt them. Assimilating new information is part of my job description. In my job, I have to have a quick mind and good memory.

Dellani: When you walk into a room, what do you notice first?

Matilda: I look around for familiar faces. Essentially, I'm shy in social situations. Professionally, I'm very confident. When I get in a group with people I don't know very well, I'm just as likely to end up by myself in a corner someplace.

Dellani: Is one sense more highly developed than another?

Matilda: My hearing. I'm not sure why, but I can hear higher frequencies than most other people. My father says it would come in handy for mining Trimagnite, but no daughter of his is going to get into that life. I also seem to have perfect pitch. Not that I can sing a perfect 'C' or anything, but I can tell when an instrument isn't properly tuned or someone is singing off key. Which is ironic, because Wil is tone deaf.

Dellani: Do you usually notice problems around you?

Matilda: It depends on what the problems are, I think. I have to admit, I'm not always the most observant person around. I do notice big things, but little squabbles, inconsistencies, probably not. If I see a problem, I deal with it.

Dellani: Would you say you're an optimist or a pessimist?

Matilda: I'm decidedly an optimist. However, you can't live around Wil without developing some cynicism. He can be a serious pessimist, though he'll deny it. I have to keep it light or he'll bring me down.

Dellani: Are you more interested in the past, the future or living in the now?

Matilda: All three are connected, don't you think? I wouldn't be the person I am without my past. I can't look toward the future without living through the now. We shape our future by who we were and who we are now.

Dellani: How do you decide if you can trust someone?

Matilda: I go on instinct and feelings. Wil tells me that's the worst thing to do, but it's worked for me so far. I may not be as paranoid and discerning as he is, but I'm pretty damn accurate. Of course, I've trusted some people that he thought I was flat crazy at the time. When it turns out I was right, he's such a baby! I believe I'm accurate because I've got strong, but untrained, telepathic abilities. I can read people without realizing I'm doing it.

Dellani: Are you a deliberate, careful speaker or do you talk without thinking first?

Matilda: I tend to blurt things out without thinking. I'm working on that.


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